Speeding Tickets in Maryland

Speeding Ticket Fines and Points in Maryland

If you are pulled over and cited for exceeding the speed limit, usually an officer will cite you with a specific amount you have allegedly gone over the speed limit.  The categories are found below with the respective fines and points on conviction where there has been no accident and where there was an accident.

Driving Vehicle on Highway at Speed Exceeding Limit, often appearing as a short hand citation of Driving Veh. On Hwy. at Speed Exceeding Limit.

Exceeding the speed limit by:

1 to 9 mph on conviction is an $80.00 fine & 1 point, but $120.00 fine & 3 points where there has been an accident.

10 to 19 mph on conviction is an $90.00 fine & 2 points, but $130.00 fine & 3 points where there has been an accident.

20 to 29 mph on conviction is an $160.00 fine & 2 points, but $200.00 fine & 3 points where there has been an accident.

Exceeding a speed limit of 70 mph by 10 to 19 mph on conviction is an $160.00 fine & 2 points, but $200.00 fine & 3 points where there has been an accident.

Exceeding a speed limit of 70 mph by 20 to 29 mph on conviction is an $290.00 fine & 5 points (whether there was an accident or not).

30 to 39 mph on conviction is an $290.00 fine & 5 points (whether there was an accident or not).

40 mph and over on conviction is an $530.00 fine & 5 points (whether there was an accident or not).

For more information on points, click here.

 

What to do if you get a speeding ticket in Maryland

If an officer issues you a speeding ticket, do not ignore it under any circumstances. Failing to respond to a traffic ticket will result in a suspended license, and you’ll have to pay additional fees to have the suspension resolved.

You have the option of pleading guilty, guilty with an explanation, or not guilty to your charge. Should you plead guilty, you’ll need to contact the traffic court in the location in which you were ticketed to remit payment. Most jurisdictions in Maryland offer online payment. By pleading guilty or guilty with an explanation, you will still receive points on your license.

Generally speaking, it can be a wiser move to plead not guilty and request a trial date. If you show up to court and your ticketing officer does not, the violation may be thrown out. Pleading not guilty also offers you the opportunity to plea down your violation. For example, maybe you were caught doing 95 miles per hour in a 70 mile per hour zone, but the judge offers you the opportunity to plead guilty to going 89 in a 70—a lesser violation with a more manageable fine and fewer number of points. Assuming a clean driving record with zero points to start, you will have gone from mandatory enrollment in a Driver Improvement Program to simply receiving a warning letter from the Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA).

Perhaps the biggest reason to go to court is the availability of the option of Probation Before Judgment (or PBJ).  Probation Before Judgment is explained in greater detail here, but the short version is this:  Probation Before Judgment allows an opportunity to keep points off your driving record.  This PBJ status is coveted because it should not negatively impact your car insurance rates AND you have avoided a conviction.

Should I hire a lawyer for my speeding ticket?

A traffic ticket may seem overwhelming, but a traffic lawyer will know your options and guide you through the process.  Retaining a lawyer for a speeding ticket does not have to break your budget.  For more serious violations, it is highly suggested you consider hiring an attorney to handle your case.  Schedule a consultation with a lawyer at the Law Office of Andrew Hoverman, LLC today and we will be happy to meet with you and provide a quote for your case.

© 2017 by the Law Office of Andrew Hoverman, LLC

Disclaimer: The information contained in this web site is intended to convey general information. It should not be construed as legal advice or opinion. It is not an offer to represent you, nor is it intended to create an attorney-client relationship. Any email sent via the Internet using email addresses listed in this web site would not be confidential and would not create an attorney-client relationship.

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